Sal Kimber - Sounds like thunder

  • Model: TN1654-80
  • Shipping Weight: 0.125kgs
  • 10 Units in Stock

$25.00

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Sal Kimber - Sounds Like Thunder Cd review by Chris Spencer
Of all the albums I’ve reviewed this month, this one has proved the most diffi cult. Sal Kimber is from Glenrowan in Victoria, and this is her 2nd recording, her fi rst being an ep. Positive press such as this description from the Basement Discs website: “Sounding rural & rootsy, but with urban savvy, her songs are perfect stories within a beautifully arranged and featuring wonderfully sympathetic and innovative instrumentation.” suggest that Sal has a sound that should be heard. I wasn’t so convinced on fi rst listens, but her songs grow on you. Not in a way where you will be singing along to melodies, but more in the appreciation of the arrangements and song writing. The songs that work best on this album are the ones that feature Kimber’s banjo playing, such as the title track, “Platform”, - the train song, “No Shoes” and “Katie Brown”. Perhaps these songs work best because the musicianship comes to the fore and there’s less reliance on the words and vocals. Other songs I enjoyed were the shuffl e “Tempt the Rain” with its use of drum brushes and double bass. “Sunnyside” also features the banjo; “Met Police” is a jaunty poke at ticket inspectors on trains, while “Distance” is slower with a guitar solo. To give you some pinpointers to what Sal’s voice is like, at times, I caught myself thinking of Kasey Chambers and Stevie Nicks:- not a pure voice, but one with a bit of character and timbre. Musicians who are listed as assisting with the recording include Shane French, Dan Smith and Liz Frencham, although their individual roles are not identifi ed. Kimber’s music is neither folk nor country, defi nitely not bluegrass, although at times infl uences from these three genres can be gleaned. If you enjoy banjo music, you might be disappointed that there isn’t more emphasis on banjo playing, but I enjoyed hearing the instrument as a support to Kimber’s vocals, rather than an “album for banjo”. After several listens, this album becomes a recommended, rather than just “have a listen” to see if you like it.Sal Kimber - Sounds Like
Thunder
by Chris Spencer
Of all the albums I’ve reviewed
this month, this one has
proved the most diffi cult.
Sal Kimber is from Glenrowan
in Victoria, and this is her 2nd
recording, her fi rst being an ep.
Positive press such as this
description from the Basement
Discs website: “Sounding rural &
rootsy, but with urban savvy, her
songs are perfect stories within a
beautifully arranged and featuring
wonderfully sympathetic and
innovative instrumentation.” suggest
that Sal has a sound that should be
heard.
I wasn’t so convinced on fi rst
listens, but her songs grow on you.
Not in a way where you will be
singing along to melodies, but
more in the appreciation of the
arrangements and song writing.
The songs that work best on this
album are the ones that feature
Kimber’s banjo playing, such as
the title track, “Platform”, - the
train song, “No Shoes” and “Katie
Brown”.
Perhaps these songs work best
because the musicianship comes to
the fore and there’s less reliance on
the words and vocals.
Other songs I enjoyed were the
shuffl e “Tempt the Rain” with its use
of drum brushes and double bass.
“Sunnyside” also features the
banjo; “Met Police” is a jaunty poke
at ticket inspectors on trains, while
“Distance” is slower with a guitar
solo.
To give you some pinpointers to
what Sal’s voice is like, at times,
I caught myself thinking of Kasey
Chambers and Stevie Nicks:- not
a pure voice, but one with a bit of
character and timbre.
Musicians who are listed as
assisting with the recording include
Shane French, Dan Smith and Liz
Frencham, although their individual
roles are not identifi ed.
Kimber’s music is neither folk nor
country, defi nitely not bluegrass,
although at times infl uences from
these three genres can be gleaned.
If you enjoy banjo music, you
might be disappointed that there
isn’t more emphasis on banjo
playing, but I enjoyed hearing the
instrument as a support to Kimber’s
vocals, rather than an “album for
banjo”.
After several listens, this album
becomes a recommended, rather
than just “have a listen” to see if you
like it.



This product was added to our catalog on Sunday 24 January, 2010.

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